Tag Archives: celestron

A View of the Crater CLAVIUS

I snapped this picture of the crater Clavius, on our moon, back on September 22, 2015 and just finished processing it. Clavius is a large crater found on the southern side of the moon, it measures approximately 136 miles across. The crater was named after Christoph Klau (or Christophorus Clavius) a 16th century German mathematician and astronomer.

I will always remember this crater as being the location of the lunar base in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Yellow box shows the location of Clavius.

Yellow box shows the location of Clavius.

Crater Clavius

Crater Clavius

Technical Info: Images were captured using a Celestron 6″ telescope with a Canon 6D at prime focus, mounted on an iOptron ZEQ25 mount. Video stream captured using Backyard EOS, 2000 total frames captured. I then processed the frames using AS!2, the best 400 frames were stacked. Captured on September 22, 2015.

Clear skies!

…Tom

Messier 27 – The Dumbbell Nebula

I was going through some imaging sessions from September and found this image set of the Dumbbell Nebula from September 16, 2015.  The Dumbbell Nebula is also known as Messier 27 or M27 and can be found in the constellation Vulpecula (see below).

By IAU and Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott & Rick Fienberg) ([1]) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons.

Messier 27 lies at a distance of about 1,360 light years. It is estimated that the age of this nebula is between 10,000 and 15,000 years old, depending on the methodology used.

I photographed M27 using a Canon 6D and Celestron 6″ telescope, 19 minutes total exposure time using 30-second subs at ISO 3200. I don’t think the results are too bad for only 19 minutes of light.

Messier 27 - 19 minute exposure in September 2015.

Messier 27 – 19 minute exposure in September 2015.

Information from SEDS (http://messier.seds.org/m/m027.html)

Right Ascension 19 : 59.6 (h:m)
Declination +22 : 43 (deg:m)
Distance 1.25 (kly)
Visual Brightness 7.4 (mag)
Apparent Dimension 8.0 x 5.7 (arc min)

Clear Skies!

…Tom

The Planet Uranus and Moons Titania and Oberon

On the same evening I imaged Neptune for the first time, I also took this image of the planet Uranus and two of its moons, Oberon and Titania. I included some reference magnitudes on the image as well as the listed magnitudes of the two moons. This is a stacked image of just five 15-second exposures at ISO 6400. The orange glow in the lower left is from light pollution due to the low elevation of Uranus at the time this image was taken (October 12, 2015).

SETUP: Meade 12″ LX90 and Canon 6D, simple 15 second exposures at ISO 6400 (five stacked images). Image taken on October 12, 2015. You can click HERE to view my deepsky imaging setup.

Uranus and two of its moons, Oberon and Titania.

Uranus and two of its moons, Oberon and Titania.

Clear skies!

…Tom

Neptune and Triton – First Time Image

I know this image will probably not mean much to seasoned astrophotographers (unless you think back to the first time you imaged this distant planet), but to me, I was thrilled! This is the first time I photographed the planet Neptune and its moon Triton. Looking forward to spending more time imaging this planet over the next several months and trying some video captures.

SETUP: Meade 12″ LX90 and Canon 6D, simple 15 second exposures at ISO 6400 (five stacked images). Image taken on October 12, 2015. You can click HERE to view my deepsky imaging setup.

Neptune and Triton

Neptune and Triton

 

Clear skies!

…Tom

Deepsky Imaging Setup

Here are the details on my current deepsky imaging setup that I will refer to in future image references. The system includes:

  • Meade 12″ LX90 Telescope.
  • Celestron CGEM DX Mount.
  • Antares f/6.3 Focal Reducer.
  • Canon 6D DSLR Camera.

Ethernet cable allow me to run the system from inside my home (useful for winter sessions and summer sessions).

Due to the weight of this setup, I’m limited to imaging sessions from my driveway. The system is on a JMI Wheeley Bar to move it in/out of the garage. Paint marks on the driveway help my quickly setup and align the system.

Deepsky Imaging Setup

Deepsky Imaging Setup

Issues:

  1. The Celestron mount should have come with a polar alignment scope, I paid an extra $39.00 to have one ordered. While you can get it close by looking through the “peep hole”, I think the scope will help.
  2. Still having some focus issues with the LX90. I use a Bahtinov mask to achieve focus, but imaging smaller stars always seem to be slightly out of focus.

I’ll keep this up-to-date as things change/or are added.

…Tom

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